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Making Every Lesson Count: chapter 2

Classroom teachingPosted by emma@ecwilliams.me.uk Thu, August 23, 2018 17:30:44
Chapter 2 of Making Every Lesson Count focuses on explanation and starts with an arresting challenge: just how much quality concrete information do students learn from research-based group tasks compared to teacher explanation? This really resonated with me - it's very easy to be dazzled by the "buzz" that these kinds of lessons commonly used in the Humanities can create in a classroom; as the authors put it, students "have enjoyed the lesson - but how many have learnt anything at a deep level?"

The authors address the inescapable fact that teacher explanation has received a bad press in recent educational theory, as the advice in teacher training has moved consistently away from the "chalk and talk" model. All that guff about being a "guide on the side" instead of a "sage on the stage". Well, you know what? Sometimes the kids need a sage. The authors look closely at the growing body of evidence supporting the idea that teacher-led instruction is actually A Good Thing. They then briefly explore the methodology of how to make your explanations comprehensible and memorable.

Pleasingly, the authors move swiftly onto the importance of building blocks and dispelling misconceptions; they emphasise the key principle that lessons should always build upon prior learning, each building upon the last and addressing problems that may have become apparent in the students' work.

The authors really put the boot in when it comes to everyone's favourite sport of "guess what's inside the teacher's head", a game which we've all ended up guilty of playing in a desperate bid to keep our lessons interactive and question-based. The truth, of course, is that this is a seriously pointless way of approaching things. Their sound criticisms of this and similar methods has made me reflect again on the Cambridge Latin Course, which is based on the principle that students miraculously work out what's going on by observing it; anyone that's tried to teach like this knows that students need a huge amount of guidance to get there and sometimes - frankly - it's pointless. Just tell them, for God's sake, before we all lose the will to live.

In their defence of teacher explanation, the authors are never in danger of encouraging a static or dull classroom environment. They advocate storytelling and bringing the classroom to life. They conclude the chapter with some interesting reflections on why teacher explanation has been so overlooked in professional development, as well as a salutary reminder that poor explanations which fail to achieve student engagement will always remain one of the worst ways to teach.



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